Vaccinatons

Can the Vaccine Provide Protection Even if the Vaccine is Not a “Good” Match?

Yes, antibodies made in response to vaccination with one flu virus can sometimes provide protection against different but related viruses. A less than ideal match may result in reduced vaccine effectiveness against the virus that is different from what is in the vaccine, but it can still provide some protection against influenza illness. In addition,…

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Who Should Get The Flu Vaccine This Season?

Everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a flu vaccine. It’s especially important for the following: People who are at high risk of developing serious complications like pneumonia if they get sick with the flu. This includes: people who have certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and chronic lung disease. Pregnant…

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How do flu vaccines work?

Flu vaccines (the flu shot and the nasal-spray flu vaccine (LAIV)) cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against three influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the…

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Vaccine Side Effects (What to Expect)

The flu shot: The viruses in the flu shot are killed (inactivated), so you cannot get the flu from a flu shot. Some minor side effects that could occur are: Soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given Fever (low grade) Aches If these problems occur, they begin soon after the shot and usually…

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Why should people get vaccinated against the flu?

Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently. Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others. Over a period of 31 seasons between 1976 and 2007, estimates of flu-associated deaths…

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When Should I Get Vaccinated?

The CDC recommends vaccination against influenza as soon as flu season vaccine becomes available in their community. Influenza seasons are unpredictable, and can begin as early as October. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against the flu. Flu vaccine is produced by private manufacturers,…

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